Colors

Primary Colors

Notre Dame blue (Pantone 289), gold (Pantone 117), and metallic gold (Pantone 10127) are Notre Dame’s primary colors.

Neither color will ever reproduce as brightly and richly in four-color process as it does as a spot ink.

Spot colors are more accurate than screen-built colors. Colors displayed below will vary from printed tones.

Electronic displays (LCD screens, CRT monitors, etc.) may display colors slightly different than in print. Gold is a particularly challenging color. As such, an alternate gold has been provided for electronic applications.

  • Blue
    Pantone 289
    c100 m76 y12 k70
    r12 g35 b64
    #0C2340
  • Gold
    Pantone 117
    c6 m27 y100 k12
    r201 g151 b0
    #c99700
  • Metallic Gold
    Pantone 10127
    c31 m39 y89 k6
    r174 g143 b64
    #ae9142

Secondary Colors

The secondary color palette is provided to aid the design of communications that reflect the University of Notre Dame’s brand in tone and style through consistent use of color.

Although the University’s primary colors are blue and gold, marketing communications can be made more effective and compelling with a more flexible and sophisticated use of color harmony and contrast. Colors rendered on screen from official Hex values. Printed tones will vary.

These secondary colors have been inspired by the heritage of Notre Dame.

  • Pantone 460
    c11 m11 y62 k0
    r230 g212 b124
    #f6e7a1
  • Pantone 378
    c61 m44 y100 k31
    r88 g96 b26
    #465510
  • Pantone 613
    c32 m33 y100 k3
    r179 g153 b0
    #999623
  • Pantone black 4
    c59 m65 y74 k71
    r49 g37 b28
    #302205
  • Pantone 1817
    c40 m78 y67 k45
    r101 g50 b51
    #5f1709
  • Pantone 7710
    c79 m13 y28 k0
    r0 g165 b181
    #5aabbc

Tertiary Colors

Like the secondary colors, the tertiary color palette is intended to add breadth and depth to our overall look and feel. These tertiary colors have been chosen to complement the other brand colors and provide an expanded family of colors. These colors should be used only as accent colors or in limited ways. Colors rendered on screen from official Hex values. Printed tones will vary.

  • Pantone 1805
    c21 m98 y92 k12
    r177 g37 b44
    #aa272f
  • Pantone 723
    c24 m63 y100 k10
    r179 g105 b33
    #ba6f2e
  • Pantone 128
    c5 m13 y82 k0
    r245 g212 b77
    #f2d653
  • Pantone 7519
    c51 m60 y71 k41
    r93 g73 b58
    #5a412f
  • Pantone 7406
    c7 m21 y100 k0
    r242 g195 b0
    #ffcf01
  • Pantone 348
    c96 m02 y100 k12
    r10 g132 b61
    #00843D
  • Pantone 7448
    c66 m76 y47 k40
    r75 g55 b75
    #4a3651


Are the Secondary and Tertiary Colors Mandatory?

The color palette has been carefully selected to create a cohesive family that allows for a range of creative possibilities for the University masterbrand. Use of these elements in communications will help create and maintain a consistent look and feel for our collective key audiences. Communicators are not required to use these colors, but please consider their use.

In which cases should I use the primary colors?

These colors should be the dominant colors on communications to highly affiliated audiences like alumni, donors, and advisory councils. The primary color palette makes up almost 90% of the color use for these audiences.

In which cases should I use secondary and tertiary colors?

Communicators are welcome to consider the secondary color palette for communications to audiences more loosely affiliated with the University. Refer to the diagram where the gray sections indicate the use of the secondary color palette.

The tertiary color palette is intended to be used in small amounts as accent colors for the primary and secondary palettes.

 

Colors Visualizer